Here's Where Australia Landed on The World’s Sportiest Countries List - Men's Health Magazine Australia

Here’s Where Australia Landed on The World’s Sportiest Countries List

And yep, we make the top 10. - by Nikolina Ilic

 

Germany takes the title of the world’s sportiest country with a score of 70.42 out of 100. They placed in the top 10 for five different categories, as well holding the top spot for elite sport ranking and Winter Olympic medals.

 

AP

 

When it comes to working out in the gym, Sweden comes out on top, with almost a quarter of the population having a gym membership – a total of 22,239 gym memberships per 100,000 people.

 

Norway comes in a close second when it comes to working out in the gym, with 21,600 gym memberships per 100,000 people, followed by the United States of America with 19,393 per 100,000 people.

 

When it comes to recreational activities, 48% of people in Finland class health and fitness as a hobby, followed by 43% of people in India and South Africa and 42% of people in Sweden and Mexico.

 

Sports in Canada consist of a wide variety of games. The most common sports are ice hockey, lacrosse, gridiron football, soccer, and basketball.

 

Although Roger Federer is the most famous Swiss sportsperson in the world, the most popular sport in Switzerland is football. Around 10,000 matches are played every weekend.

 

Sports are widely practiced in Austria, both in professional and amateur competitions. The most popular sports are association football, alpine skiing and ice hockey. Although low in their Olympic medals, Austria made up for it in the Winter Olympics and the percentage of the population who have hobbies.

 

Up there for their ranking in Elite Sports, Netherlands most popular sports include soccer, field hockey and korfball (of of the most calorie-burning alternative sports out there).

 

Coming in at 10th place, Australia did well with their amount of Olympic medals however lost in the Winter Olympic Medals department (naturally).

 

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With the Olympics having passed and the Paralympics in full throttle, the world’s most athletic people are gaining the spotlight they deserve after years of incredible efforts in their training – and the delays that have come with the coronavirus pandemic. 

Sportsperson against sportsperson, athletes compete for the gold, silver, and bronze medals – with each country tallying up their wins in hope of coming out on top with the most wins. But while the Olympics and Paralympics are a huge moment for nations – sport also plays an important role outside of the games: in the daily lives of people around the world, with the global sports market expected to be worth a whopping $599.9 billion by 2025.

But which are the sportiest nations around the world? To find out more, MyProtein investigated the sporting backgrounds of over 130 countries, comparing them across 10 different criteria, covering both professional performance and personal participation.

They looked at 134 countries around the world, collecting data across 10 different categories. Using a weighted ranking system, each country was then given a score for each of the 10 criteria, which were then combined to create the final score out of 100. Each of the 10 criteria made up 10% of the final score. If a country was missing data for a specific category, an international average was calculated and given to those countries with incomplete data.

Check out the top 10 above.

Nikolina Ilic

By Nikolina Ilic

Nikolina is the web-obsessed Digital Editor at Men's and Women's Health, responsible for all things social media and .com. A lover of boxing, when she's not sweating it out in the gym, she's spending time with her terrific toddler. She was previously a Digital Editor at GQ and Vogue magazine.

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