Here's How Covid-19 Has Changed The Way We Work Out For Good | Men's Health Magazine Australia

Here’s How Covid-19 Has Changed The Way We Work Out For Good

2020 changed a lot of things for us, it changed the way we work, it changed the way we socialise, and it changed the way we approach hygiene (more on that here). But one of the most interesting impacts an almost 12-month pandemic had on the general population was our cadence of everyday life. While […]

2020 changed a lot of things for us, it changed the way we work, it changed the way we socialise, and it changed the way we approach hygiene (more on that here). But one of the most interesting impacts an almost 12-month pandemic had on the general population was our cadence of everyday life.

While yes, a lot of people have learned how to work out better at home, there has been a wider impact of the way we as a country respond to working out. A new study that analyses the effect the fast-spreading respiratory disease had on our lifestyle habits and, more specifically, our exercise, reveals that after being stuck working out inside for so long, we’re heading outside instead.

RunRepeat, a review site focused on athletic shoes, analysed the impact of the pandemic on the fitness industry and found that 59.1 per cent of survey participants found that exercise including running, hiking, walking and cycling was the best way to achieve their fitness goals.

What’s more, a BMJ study explored how the pandemic (despite its economic and societal destruction) may have led to the population having an interest in working out more so than ever.

The data in the study suggests that “despite challenges to an active lifestyle, the COVID-19 lockdown may have led to increases in population-level interest in and engagement with physical activity. Potential explanations for the relative increase in exercise interest include compensation for reduced incidental activities, availability of discretionary time, increased health awareness and ubiquitous messages recommending exercise during COVID-19 from media, governments and health authorities.”

Another survey found that 62 per cent of adults also considered that staying active is more important now than before the pandemic, and that those exercising regularly have been after expert help more than ever, with 47.5 per cent of people hiring personal trainers and nutritionists.

Here’s to a (hopefully) healthier future.

By Mens Health Staff

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