Science Backed Tips On How To Maintain A Healthy Prostate | Men's Health Magazine Australia

Expert Tips On Maintaining A Healthy Prostate

In figures released by the Australian Government, prostate cancer is the third most common form of cancer found amongst Aussie men, with more than 21,000 men diagnosed each year, and 3300 deaths.

Whilst extremely alarming and prevalent, the good news is, as far as cancers go, it’s pretty curable if treated and identified early. More than 98 percent of men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer survive for five years or more. But the percentage drops when we’re talking about advanced cases. Once the cancer has spread to distant organs, the five-year survival rate is just 30 percent, SEER data shows.

Prostate cancer is notoriously symptom-free in its early stages, which is one benefits of the screening test, says Dr. James Wysock, urologic oncologist and assistant professor of urology at NYU Langone Health.

“One of the most well-known ways to have your prostate checked is by having your doctor perform a Digital Rectal Exam (DRE),” advises Swisse Science Expert, João Paulino de Carvalho.  “[During the exam] they insert a gloved finger into the rectum to get a feel of the size and shape of your prostate.”

Despite the recommendations of experts, screening has only recently been deemed to be successful for prostate cancer. A study just published in September seems to support the test for older guys. In fact, the average man should consider PSA screenings for prostate cancer beginning at age 56 and continuing to 69—and earlier if you have a family history of prostate cancer, Men’s Health urology advisor Larry Lipshultz, M.D., recommends.

“One of the most well-known ways to have your prostate checked is by having your doctor perform a Digital Rectal Exam (DRE),” advises João Paulino de Carvalho, Swisse Science Expert. “[During the exam] they insert a gloved finger into the rectum to get a feel of the size and shape of your prostate.”

So what can be done to prevent the onset of prostate cancer and minimise the risk of development. Well, a few of the prevention methods are actually quite fun and enjoyable: drink coffee, orgasm, and sit down. Yep, that’s right!

EAT AND DRINK RIGHT

“For prostate health, consider including in your diet more plant-derived fats, Omega-3 fatty acids, tomatoes and berries, and less red meat, dairy products and alcohol,” suggests Paulino de Carvalho. Additionally, a new study says that drinking three espressos per day can cut your risk of developing prostate cancer in half. 

The study was conducted by the Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed in Italy, home of the espresso, monitoring 7,000 men in the Molise region for four years, taking note of their coffee consumption. According to the researchers there was a 53 percent lower risk in those who drank at least three cups per day.

GET BUSY

In further cancer busting research, a recent study found that ejaculating frequently can help reduce the risk of prostate cancer by up to 22 per cent.

After surveying 32,000 men between 1992 and 2010, researchers found that men who ejaculated more than 21 times per month throughout their 20s, were 19 per cent less likely to develop prostate cancer.

Older than 40? Even better. Frequent ejaculation will reduce your risk by 22 per cent. And the results are confirmed by local scientist as well. A similar study in Australia found that men who averaged 4.6-7 ejaculations a week were 36 per cent less likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer before the age of 70.

TAKE A SEAT

According to research from the Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands, sitting down to pee allows for ‘a more favourable urodynamic profile’ [translation: the flow is stronger] which helps ward off prostate problems.

The study goes on to suggest that when we stand, we activate muscles around our lower abdomen, pelvis and spine that actually prevent proper urination, and damage our prostate. Good enough reason to take a load off when visiting the men’s room.

By Mens Health Staff

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