Study Finds Listening To Just 78 Minutes Of Music A Day Is Good For Your Mental Health | Men's Health Magazine Australia

Listening To Just 78 Minutes Of Music A Day Is Good For Your Mental Health

New research from the British Academy of South Therapy has found that listening to just 78 minutes of music a day can maintain good mental health. And more importantly, just one and a half Taylor Swift songs is all it takes to notice a difference. 

Analysing the effects of music on 7500 people around the world, researchers suggest that a “balanced diet” of different tunes is key, with  a good mix of songs that are uplifting, relaxing, motivating and even depressing. The team have actually put together a recommended playlist:

  • 4 minutes of uplifting music (user’s choice) to feel happy 
  • 16 minutes of calming music (user’s choice) to feel relaxed 
  • 16 minutes of music (user’s choice) to overcome sadness 
  • 15 minutes of motivating music (user’s choice) to aid concentration 
  • 17 minutes of music (user’s choice) to help manage anger

The findings have have also revealed the common emotional benefits of music:

  • 90 per cent of participants reporting that music made them relax
  • 82 per cent of participants reporting that music made them happier
  • 47 per cent of participants reporting that music helped them deal with sadness
  • 32 per cent of participants reporting that music helped them concentrate
  • 28 per cent of participants reporting that music helped them deal with anger

The results suggest that 78 minutes is the optimal amount of time you should spend listening to bangers, but researchers also found that just 11 minutes can have a positive impact while just five minutes of music can help boost your mood. 

“There are certain properties of music that affect the mind and body. Dedicating time each day to listen to music that triggers different emotions can have a hugely beneficial impact on our well-being. Listening to happy songs increases blood flow to areas of the brain associated with reward, and decreases flow to the amygdala, the part of the brain associated with fear,” says BAST researcher Lyz Cooper.

By Mens Health Staff

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